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SAGE Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care

Want to hear latest research in Palliative Medicine? Want to receive practical guidance to clinical practice in palliative patient care?   Every month, this podcast features an author from Palliative Medicine, a highly ranked, peer reviewed scholarly journal dedicated to improving knowledge and clinical practice in the palliative care. In these focussed 10 minute episodes, the authors provide a personal interpretation of their published work. You’ll hear learn from original papers, reviews, case reports, editorials and other interesting work published in the journal.
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Now displaying: October, 2018
Oct 15, 2018

This episode features Dr Cathy Payne (Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Ulster University, Newtownabbey, UK).

This qualitative study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of patients and healthcare professionals on the feasibility and acceptability of palliative rehabilitation during advanced lung cancer treatment. The results of this study demonstrated that patient participants perceived that an individualised behaviour change programme which combined physical activity, exercise and nutritional guidance was of value and should be offered to all those wishing to be actively involved in their cancer management. Engagement in a palliative rehabilitation study led healthcare professionals to have more positive attitudes towards rehabilitation as a component of advanced cancer treatment.

This study highlights the potential impact of palliative rehabilitation as a component of advanced cancer management, but further work is needed to incorporate rehabilitation within lung cancer treatment pathways. Further research is needed to determine if the views held by patient participants are reflective of the wider population of those receiving systemic therapy with palliative intent.

Full paper available from: http://journals.sagepub.com.liverpool.idm.oclc.org/doi/full/10.1177/0269216318794086

If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

Oct 15, 2018

This episode features Dr Karen Neoh (St Gemma’s Academic Unit of Palliative Care, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK).

This national audit  aimed to determine national transfusion practice in hospices and compare this against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and British Society of Haematology guidelines to develop recommendations to improve practice.

The results demonstrated that patients are not usually investigated for the cause of their anaemia, of those that were a significant proportion would have benefitted from B12, folate or iron supplementation, although these were rarely used. Transfusion practice remains too liberal despite greater risks of transfusion-associated circulatory overload in patients with advanced disease. Only 18% of transfused patients had an improvement maintained up to 30 days; 42% had no or very transient benefit, and 32% were dead at 30 days. The authors conclude that more rigorous investigation of anaemia, increased use of alternative therapies and a more restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions are needed. Furthermore, clinicians should discuss with patients the limited benefit versus higher risks of red blood cell transfusion in this patient group to inform treatment decisions and ensure informed consent.

Full paper available from: http://journals.sagepub.com.liverpool.idm.oclc.org/doi/full/10.1177/0269216318801755

If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

Oct 12, 2018

This episode features Professor Mari Lloyd Williams (Academic Palliative and Supportive Care Studies Group, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK). This was a pilot trial to determine the effect of a focused narrative intervention on depression in palliative care patients when used in addition to usual care. The study found that focused narrative intervention can be an effective intervention for moderate to severe depression in palliative care patients when used in addition to usual care. The effect of the intervention appears to be sustained at 6-week follow-up. Those randomised to the intervention appeared to have longer survival than patients randomised to usual care. This study supports the requirement for a larger randomised controlled trial. The focused narrative intervention could be delivered by any member of a palliative care team. The cost benefits of the intervention need to be explored in further studies.

Full paper available from: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216317711322

If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

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