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SAGE Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care

Want to hear latest research in Palliative Medicine? Want to receive practical guidance to clinical practice in palliative patient care?   Every month, this podcast features an author from Palliative Medicine, a highly ranked, peer reviewed scholarly journal dedicated to improving knowledge and clinical practice in the palliative care. In these focussed 10 minute episodes, the authors provide a personal interpretation of their published work. You’ll hear learn from original papers, reviews, case reports, editorials and other interesting work published in the journal.
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Now displaying: May, 2019
May 7, 2019

This episode features Deidre Morgan (Palliative and Supportive Services, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia).
 

Functional decline can be anticipated for people with life-limiting illnesses. Trajectories of functional decline differ in shapes and patterns. Understanding patterns of functional decline has implications for patient care and design of responsive health services.

This prospective study identifies two contemporary trajectories of functional decline for patients receiving specialist palliative care in the last 120 days of life. Precipitous deterioration in functional decline for cancers, solid organ failure and cardiovascular disease occurs as cohorts of patients approach Australia-modified Karnofsky Performance Status (AKPS) of 40. The pattern of functional decline for the neurological and dementias cohorts is flatter, showing a prolonged period of low function.

Study findings highlight that different types of care responses and resource allocation may be needed at different time points in different trajectories. This may require rapid mobilisation of carer support and modification of care plans preceding a precipitous functional decline (Trajectory 1). Extended periods of support to maintain patient function and support carers are required for those with a prolonged slow rate of functional decline (Trajectory 2).


Full paper available from:  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216319839024
 
If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

May 7, 2019

This episode features Katrin Gerber ( National Ageing Research Institute & Queensland University of Technology).
 
Research  suggests that people generally would like to receive their end of life care at home. This study aimed to examine the decision making process of how preferences are formed. This qualitative study involved interviews of 9 terminally patients and 8 family carers. The authors found that people's preferences for place of end of life care depended on various factors. Preferences changed with the demands of the situation and were affected by factors such as symptoms, carer capacity and prognosis. This paper further details that instead of only asking 'where do you want to die?' healthcare professionals could consider  asking 'why?' to further understand how preferences are formed and change.
 

Full paper available from:  No weblink available yet
 
If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

May 3, 2019

This episode features Sarah Combes (Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery & Palliative Care, King's College London, UK).
 

Older people living with frailty are projected to become one of the largest future users of palliative care. Advance care planning can improve person centred end of life care. However advance care planning is relatively uncommon in frail elders due to many challenges. This review aimed to understand how advance care planning could be better implemented in frail elder population, and to develop a conceptual model to underpin future development. The study concluded that a system wide approach is needed that recognised the importance of living well now, relationships and early engagement. All stakeholders have educational needs; specifically clinicians need to be given the opportunity to develop skills and competencies to recognise, proactively use and create advance care planning opportunities at the end of life.



 
 
Full paper available from: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216319845804

If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

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