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SAGE Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care

Want to hear latest research in Palliative Medicine? Want to receive practical guidance to clinical practice in palliative patient care?   Every month, this podcast features an author from Palliative Medicine, a highly ranked, peer reviewed scholarly journal dedicated to improving knowledge and clinical practice in the palliative care. In these focussed 10 minute episodes, the authors provide a personal interpretation of their published work. You’ll hear learn from original papers, reviews, case reports, editorials and other interesting work published in the journal.
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Now displaying: July, 2019
Jul 26, 2019

This episode features Dr Amara Nwosu (Palliative Care Institute Liverpool and Marie Curie Hospice Liverpool, Liverpool, UK).  Medical robots have mainly been used to support surgical procedures and for a variety of assistive uses in dementia and elderly care. There has been limited debate about the potential opportunities and risks of robotics in other areas of palliative, supportive and end-of-life care. The potential opportunities of robotics in palliative, supportive and end-of-life care include a number of assistive, therapeutic, social and educational uses. There is concern that robots will exacerbate healthcare inequalities, disrupt the workforce and reduce face-to-face human interaction. Future work should evaluate the health-related, economic, societal and ethical implications of using robotic technology in palliative, supportive and end-of-life care. There is a need for collaborative research to establish use-cases and policy recommendations to guide the appropriate use of robots for people with serious illness.

Full paper available from:   https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216319857628
 
If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

Jul 26, 2019

This episode features André Filipe Ribeiro (Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal). The number of patients with morbidities and other complex injuries due to burns has grown over the years. This kind of burn injuries can have a high impact in the physical and psychological health, cause social transformations and changes in role functioning. Palliative care is an active and global specialty of care that can take prominence as a strengthening component of integrated treatment. This systematic review offers a comprehensive overview about the potential benefits of integrating palliative care in burn intensive care units. The integration of palliative care in burn intensive care units can improve patients’ comfort, decision-making processes, and family care. This systematic review can raise awareness about the potential of integrating palliative care in burn intensive care units to both policy makers and healthcare professionals. This review highlights the need for further research in order to develop a better understanding on how palliative care can be best integrated in the care process of patients in burn intensive care units.
 
Full paper available from:   https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0269216319862160

If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

 

Jul 22, 2019

This episode features Rebecca Anderson (Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department,  University College London, London, UK).  Poor communication from healthcare professionals is a common complaint from relatives of patients at the end-of-life. Communication with relatives at this time is important for high quality end-of-life care and for relatives’ long-term well-being. Common communication strategies are identified including highlighting the patient’s deterioration to aid decision-making, references to patient wishes, providing relatives with options, tailoring information to individuals and using pacing and staging of information. Healthcare professionals state a belief in using honest, direct language and involving families in decision-making, but there is variation in the extent to which this is implemented in practice. Nurses and allied healthcare professionals play an important role in providing individualized communication with relatives. There is a need for more research on communication with relatives in palliative care settings and with different members of the multidisciplinary team. Training is needed to help healthcare professionals to translate communication guidelines into practice while considering their own emotional needs. Interventions such as question prompt list could also be used to help relatives get the information they need.
 

Full paper available from: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216319852007

 
If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

Jul 19, 2019

This episode features Professor Miriam Johnson (Hull York Medical School, UK). People with heart failure have poor access to palliative care. People with advanced heart failure have poorer access to palliative care than people with cancer and the evidence base in support of heart failure palliative care is less developed. This systematic review draws together the current literature, both observational and experimental, investigating the use of palliative care in people with symptomatic heart failure. The findings support the use of multi-disciplinary palliative care in this patient group, as distinct from single components only, but trials do not identify who would benefit most from specialist palliative referral. There are no sufficiently robust multi-centre evaluation phase trials to provide generalisable findings.

Full paper available from:  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216319859148
 
If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

Jul 3, 2019

This episode features  Dr Bridget Candy and Dr Megan Armstrong (Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK) 
 
 
Conventional therapies are not always sufficient to provide satisfactory relief of symptoms to those at an advanced stage of a disease. Evidence on the effectiveness of complementary therapies improving the well-being of people with advanced diseases is uncertain; however, palliative care services often offer such therapies as a way to reduce stress and promote relaxation. This systematic review of qualitative studies found cancer patients (irrespective of disease stage) viewed complementary therapies as providing a sense of physical and psychological well-being. Participants with advanced cancer perceived an improvement in their physical and psychological well-being during and after the complementary therapy session. Participants with advanced cancer experienced a form of escapism or living in the moment that took away their worries about their disease and future. Participants with advanced cancer highlight how they would like the complementary therapy delivered including the importance of building a special relationship with the complementary therapist and a need for more frequent sessions. Hospices and other palliative care environments should continue/consider offering aromatherapy, reflexology and massage where possible and it should be seen as an important aspect of the palliative care people receive. Researchers should develop complementary therapy interventions in the ways in which the palliative care population, with cancer and other advanced diseases, wish them to be delivered.
 
 
Full paper available from:  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216319846440

 
If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

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