Info

SAGE Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care

Want to hear latest research in Palliative Medicine? Want to receive practical guidance to clinical practice in palliative patient care?   Every month, this podcast features an author from Palliative Medicine, a highly ranked, peer reviewed scholarly journal dedicated to improving knowledge and clinical practice in the palliative care. In these focussed 10 minute episodes, the authors provide a personal interpretation of their published work. You’ll hear learn from original papers, reviews, case reports, editorials and other interesting work published in the journal.
RSS Feed
SAGE Palliative Medicine & Chronic Care
2021
July
June
April
March
February
January


2020
December
October
August
June
April
March
January


2019
December
October
September
July
May
March
January


2018
December
November
October
August
July
April
March
January


2017
December
October
September
August
July
June
May
March
February
January


2016
November


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: January, 2021
Jan 5, 2021

This episode features Dr Catriona Mayland (University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK).

Advanced head and neck cancer patients have specific challenges due to the impact of the illness on vital functions such as eating, speaking and breathing. Identifying the palliative care needs of this specific cancer subgroup would help provide guidance about how services could best provide care.

Advanced head and neck cancer patients have a diverse range of palliative care needs, but there is variability in terms of access and timing to palliative care services. Dissonance between patients and family carers about information needs and decision-making represent additional complexities. Head and neck cancer patients frequently require acute interventions even during the last weeks of their life.

Tailored needs-based referral systems for advanced head and neck cancer patients may help address issues relating to access to palliative care services. Models of care focused on increased integration and coordination across different care settings and multi-disciplinary teams may help address issues relating to frequent use of acute interventions during the last weeks of life. Prospective multi-centre studies, potentially using mixed methods approaches, and focused on testing specific components of care may help further understand and tailor services more appropriately to meet needs.

If you would like to record a podcast about your published (or accepted) Palliative Medicine paper, please contact Dr Amara Nwosu: 
a.nwosu@lancaster.ac.uk

Jan 5, 2021

This episode features Jeanna Qiu (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA).

Maintaining quality of life for patients with malignant fungating wounds requires collaboration of diverse healthcare specialties, from oncology and palliative care to wound care. Research has explored the experiences of patients with malignant fungating wounds and the nurses who treat them. It is essential to understand the experiences and perceived roles of clinicians from different specialties and disciplines who treat patients with malignant fungating wounds

Different clinical specialties assumed the leading role at different points of the clinical care timeline with medical oncology prominent throughout care. Identifies the points in time when collaboration between specialties is essential, when communication fails, or when clinicians from different specialties have differing perspectives and experiences.

Wound care and medical oncology must collaborate effectively to ensure accurate assessment of the progression of the wound and cancer. Palliative care and oncology must partner effectively to ensure patients’ quality of life and when to stop curative treatment. Strategies like joint visits or strengthening the professional relationships across specialties such that palliative care and oncology clinicians can have open conversations about patients may help to reduce the prevalence of conflicting messages to patients.

1